Sunday, May 12, 2019

new A.I. camera that can spot you from 28 miles away

Friday, September 28, 2018

This AI Learned To See In The Dark






The paper "Learning to See in the Dark" and its source code is available here:






Thermal polarimetric imaging.





Researchers demonstrate an example of human identification using conventional and polarimetric thermal cameras. The thermal polarimetric image allows for fine facial details to emerge, researchers said. (U.S. Army Photo)



"Researchers have known for about 30 years that man-made objects emit thermal radiation that is partially polarized, for example, trucks, aircraft, buildings, vehicles, etc., and that natural objects like grass, soil, trees and bushes tend to emit thermal radiation that exhibits very little polarization," Gurton said. "We have been developing, with the help of the private sector, a special type of thermal camera that can record imagery that is based solely on the polarization state of the light rather than the intensity. This additional polarimetric information will allow Soldiers to see hidden objects that were previously not visible when using conventional thermal cameras."

"Prior to our research at ARL, the only way to view humans at night was to use conventional thermal imaging," Gurton said. "Unfortunately, such imagery is plagued by a "ghosting" effect in which detailed facial features required for human identification are lost. However, when polarization information is included in the thermal image, i.e., a thermal polarimetric image, fine facial details emerge, which allows facial recognition algorithms to be applied."

https://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm?article=3292